KEY MESSAGES

- Stake: In Ethiopia and South Sudan, arable lands and agricultural productivity are impacted by soil salination2 which constitutes a challenge to ensure food security of a growing population
- Approach: The RAMSAP1 project enables to durably protect the soils by using fertilizers, nutriments and plants adapted to the soil. The project also includes a long-term strategy to boost the productivity of the lands affected by salination
- Impact: 200 000 ha of soils restored in two countries (150 000 ha in Ethiopia, 50 000 ha in South Sudan)

 

FUNCTIONING

5 KEY STEPS FOR THE RESTORATION OF LANDS AFFECTED BY SALINATION:
Identification of trends, qualitative and quantitative, in the areas whose agricultural productivity is affected by the salt

Design and dissemination of alternative plants and fodders adapted to the properties of the soils treated

Deployment of nutriment management strategies and development of adapted fertilizers to restore the soils affected

Reinforcement of the capabilities of farmers, workers and researchers, then establishment of an information system

Development of political recommendations to improve the management of deteriorated soils

 

SCOPE

SOUTH SUDAN / ETHIOPIA
5 000 small farmers split over 20 sites
+50 000 indirect beneficiaries

 

BUDGET

$ 4 M invested
$ 2 M still to be financed

 

IMPACTS

Agricultural productivity
200 000 ha of lands restored, with increased productivity

Climate change
Adaptation: Development of sustainable agricultural practices and crops
Attenuation: Improvement of soil catchment power

Sustainable dev. goals
Increase of farms income and job creation
Reduction of rural depopulation

 

NEXT STEPS

Raise the funds required to finance the restoration of all soils concerned
Possibility to replicate the model in other regions of Ethiopia and South Sudan or in order African countries

 

1. Rehabilitation and Management of Salt-affected Soils to Improve Agricultural Productivity in Ethiopia and South Sudan
2. 11 million ha are affected by salination and too high sodium rate in Ethiopia, and less than 5% of arable lands are cultivated in South Sudan